Turkey Day (holidaze)

Turkey Day (holidaze)
Holidaze
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Another Turkey Day

R-I-P to our Natives Ancestors.
 
In 1620, the pilgrims arrived on the east coast and within two days they had received assistance from the local Wampanoag Indian tribe: The pilgrims stole their stored crops, dug up graves for dishes and pots, and took many native people as prisoners and forced them to teach crop planting and survival techniques to the colonists in their new environment.
 
In 1621 the myth of thanksgiving was born. The colonists invited Massasoit, chief of the Wampanoags, to their first feast as a follow up to their recent land deal. Massasoit in turn invited 90 of his men, much to the chagrin of the colonists. Two years later the English invited a number of tribes to a feast "symbolizing eternal friendship." The English offered food and drink, and two hundred Indians dropped dead from unknown poison.
 
The first day of thanksgiving took place in 1637 amidst the war against the Pequots. 700 men, women, and children of the Pequot tribe were gathered for their annual green corn dance on what is now Groton, Connecticut. Dutch and English mercenaries surrounded the camp and proceeded to shoot, stab, butcher and burn alive all 700 people. The next day the Massachusetts Bay Colony held a feast in celebration and the governor declared "a day of thanksgiving." In the ensuing madness of the Indian extermination, natives were scalped, burned, mutilated and sold into slavery, and a feast was held in celebration every time a successful massacre took place. The killing frenzy got so bad that even the Churches of Manhattan announced a day of "thanksgiving" to celebrate victory over the "heathen savages," and many celebrated by kicking the severed heads of Pequot people through the streets like soccer balls.
 
The proclamation of 1676 announced the first national day of thanksgiving with the onset of the Wampanoag war, the very people who helped the original colonists survive on their arrival. Massasoit, the chief invited to eat with the puritans in 1621, died in 1661. His son Metacomet, later to be known by the English as King Phillip, originally honored the treaties made by his father with the colonists, but after years of further encroachment and destruction of the land, slave trade, and slaughter, Metacomet changed his mind. In 1675 "King Phillip" called upon all natives to unite to defend their homelands from the English. For the next year the bloody conflict went on non-stop, until Metacomet was captured, murdered, quartered, his hands were cut off and sent to Boston, his head was impaled on a pike in the town square of Plymouth for the next 25 years, and his nine-year-old son was shipped to the Caribbean to be a slave for the rest of his life.
 
On June 20, 1676 Edward Rawson was unanimously voted by the governing council of Charlestown, Massachusetts, to proclaim June 29th as the first day of thanksgiving. The proclamation reads in part: "The Holy God having by a long and Continual Series of his Afflictive dispensations in and by the present War with the Heathen Natives of this land, written and brought to pass bitter things against his own Covenant people in this wilderness, yet so that we evidently discern that in the midst of his judgments he hath remembered mercyÖ The council has thought meet to appoint and set apart the 29th day of this instant June, as a day of solemn Thanksgiving and praise to God for such his Goodness and Favor..
 
Almost Everytime these people have had thanksgivings on OUR lands it has been about destroying us, enslaving us or keeping us down...There is only one thing I give thanks for everyday that I wake up. That my ancestors survived these people to bring me into this world....about 96% of at least 100 million native people didn’t make it AFTER having contact with these people.. Being the descendant of the 4% who somehow managed to survived the evil things that were done. Why is it so many native people are content to celebrate this day. By this celebrating are we truly doing justice to pains of survival our ancestors had to go thru only to celebrate the enemy society's "holydays" the very enemy society that to this day marginalizes us and still profits off the genocide they committed and continue to commit. Realize the destruction and chaos they have created in our own lives and culture.
 
This very "holyday" feeds off their nationalism. Their nationalism=Manifest Destiny..
By CAROL W. KIMBALL Day Staff Columnist Published on 11/24/2003
 
Thanksgiving is here, and according to my annual custom, I offer another chapter of Pilgrim history. You remember that we learned in school about Samoset, the Indian who appeared in Plymouth soon after the Pilgrims had settled in. They were surprised that he greeted them in English. He had learned the language from English fishermen on the coast of Maine, his original home. After visiting with the Pilgrims. Samoset informed the Wampanoag sachem Massasoit that the Pilgrims wished to make peace with the neighboring tribes.
 
Samoset later returned to Plymouth, bringing another Indian whom we know as Squanto, a corruption of his true name Tisquantum. Squanto was a native of the Patuxet tribe which once lived on the site of Plymouth. They were allied with the Wampanoags, but had been wiped out by a plague in 1617.
 
By several quirks of fate Squanto had escaped the fatal plague. In 1605 Capt. George Weymouth was exploring the Massachusetts coast on behalf of some English merchants. Deciding to bring back some real live natives for the edification of the English at home, he virtually kidnapped young Squanto and brought him to London.
 
There the lad lived with entrepreneur Sir Ferdinando Gorges and learned to speak English. Squanto eventually became a guide and interpreter for British explorers.
 
Seizing of a friend
 
In 1614 Squanto came to America to assist Captain John Smith with the mapping of Cape Cod. Smith went on to other chores, leaving Capt. Thomas Hunt in charge.
 
Hunt seized Squanto and other Indians and sailed to Spain, where he tried to sell the natives into slavery for 20 pounds each. His scheme was foiled by monks from a nearby monastery who took them to safety in the cloisters.
 
Eventually, through the offices of Sir Ferdinando Gorges, Squanto returned to the New World where he assisted Capt. Thomas Dermer to map the New England coast.
 
When they reached his former Patuxet home site Squanto learned that he was the only surviving member of his tribe.
 
With no family remaining, he moved in with a neighboring tribe at Pokanoket, the home of Massasoit.
 
When Samoset delivered the Pilgrim's message of peace to the sachem, Massasoit chose Squanto to be his interpreter, and on March 22, 1621, Massasoit and the Pilgrims met to negotiate a peace treaty. They agreed that the Pilgrims and the Wampanoags would not fight each other, and that they would support each other if either one were attacked by enemies.
 
This was a significant diplomatic step for the Pilgrims, for it brought about a peace that lasted until King Phillip's war in 1676.
 
Planting corn
 
When it was time to plant corn, wrote the Governor, “Squanto stood them in great stead, showing them both ye manner how to set it, and after how to dress & tend it. Also he tould them excepte they gott fish & set with it (in these old grounds) it would come to nothing ... all which they found true by triall & experience.” That's the part I remember from third-grade history — Squanto told them to put a fish in each hill to feed the corn so it would grow.
 
William Bradford was most appreciative of Squanto's assistance, writing, “Squanto continued with them (the Pilgrims) and was their interpreter, and was a special instrument sent of God for their good beyond their expectation. He directed them how to set their corne, wher to take fish and to procure other commodities, and was also their pilot to bring them to unknown places for their profit, and never left them till he dyed.”
 
After the harvest in the fall of 1622, the Governor and several of the company set out on a trading voyage to parts of Massachusetts. They took Squanto for a guide and interpreter. They had hoped to round Cape Cod, but because of flats and breakers they dared not venture further so they put into Manamoyack Bay. There, according to Bradford, Squanto “fell sick of an Indian fever, bleeding much at the nose (which ye Indians take for a simpton of death.)”
 
Within a few hours he died, asking the Governor to pray for him that he might go to the Englishman's God in heaven. Bradford wrote sorrowfully that his death was “a great loss.”
 
Squanto's last act was another service to the Pilgrims, for the journal notes “They got in this voyage, in one place & another, about 26 or 28 hogsheads of corne & beans, which was more than the Indians could well spare in these parts.”
 
Thus he had helped them prepare for the winter ahead.
 
It's really a very romantic tale, that of a kidnapped Native American boy. On turkey day give a thought to Squanto, friend of the Pilgrims.
 
mailto:carolkimball518@msn.com
 
http://www.theday.com/eng/web/newstand/re.aspx?reIDx=0A22568A-6DC7-446E-AE58-4080D1B8EC06
Andre Cramblit, Operations Director
Northern California Indian Development Council
andrekaruk@ncidc.org
241F Street Eureka California 95501
http://ncidc.org
(707) 445-8451

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Start of Flu Season (health)

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October Is The Start Of Flu Season

 

It’s Flu Season. Information and Tips for Kids and Parents

 

Flu season starts as early as October. Getting a shot is the best way to protect kids against the flu. We have created a list of resources that explain to kids what the flu is and ways to help prevent getting and spreading the flu. We also have some tips for parents on how to prepare kids for getting their flu shots.

 

 

 

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NCIDC, 
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(707) 445-8451
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Donate for r--skins Mascot Protests

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"People say that Indians have bigger problems than mascots and use of Native American images, but I disagree. If you can't see me as an individual, then how can you understand the problems we have as a people?" 
-- Frank LaMere, Winnebago

About EONM
 
TO DONATE GO TO: Largest r--skin Protest Ever
 
Check out Eradicating Offensive Native Mascotry. Follow our twitter account @EONMAssoc and our Instagram @EONMNews! Follow us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/eonmaim.
 
EONM (Eradicating Offensive Native Mascotry) is a grassroots movement combating the damaging appropriation of Native American imagery. Native Americans are not mascots. Native Americans are modern, living human beings who deserve to be valued in our society. 
 

NO LONGER WILL WE BE SILENT ABOUT THOSE WHO PROFIT FROM BLATANT RACISM. 

 
Why We Need Your Help
On Nov. 2, Jacqueline Keeler and Jennie Stockle, two of the founding members of EONM, will be traveling to Minnesota to join the protest against the R-skins as they play the Minnesota Vikings at the University of Minnesota’s TCF Bank Stadium. You can read more about the protest at http://wapo.st/ZmqZsY. This campaign is to raise funds for their travel expenses, lodging and food. Members of EONM are entirely volunteer and self-funded. This is my first crowd-funding effort to help these amazing women, as they have already invested so much in this this important cause.
 
EONM has been critical part of raising the the conversation about mascotry and bringing the discussion to a national level. Jacqueline is a prolific writer and has written several published essays regarding the topic and given numerous interviews. Jennie works diligently writing about the cause and supporting the movement. 
 
Help Jennie and Jacqueline bring the powerful voice of presence of EONM to this important event. Jacqueline has been invited to speak, and Jennie will be posting live updates to social media.
 
More about Jacqueline
Jacqueline Keeler is a Navajo/Yankton Dakota Sioux writer living in Portland, Oregon and is a founder of EONM.org (Eradicating Offensive Native Mascotry). She has been published in Salon.com, Indian Country Today and the Nation. She is finishing her first novel "Leaving the Glittering World" set in the shadow of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in Washington State during the discovery of Kennewick Man.
 
More About Jennie
Jennie Stockle is Cherokee-Muscogee Creek writer and activist who serves on the Executive Committee for EONM.org (Eradicating Offensive Native Mascotry). Her columns about indigenous issues have been published in many national publications including Indian Country Today, RH Reality Check, Native News Online, and BlogHer. She lives in Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma.
 
TO DONATE GO TO: Largest r--skin Protest Ever
 
 

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Andre Cramblit, Operations Director
NCIDC, 
You are receiving this email because your have requested to be part of the list or your job is related to American Indian education.
(707) 445-8451
Our mailing address is:
NCIDC
241 F Street
Eureka, CA 95501

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Native Sacred Sites Bill Passes (politics)

Native American sacred site bill passes

Assemblyman Luis Alejo 'extremely pleased'

A bill that originally upset local Native Americans has been signed into law after significant changes.

AB 52, co-authored by Assemblyman Luis Alejo, D-Watsonville, was signed by Gov. Jerry Brown last week.

"The first few versions of this bill were contentious; however, we worked with all stakeholders and tribes," Alejo said in a statement. "I am extremely pleased to note that the bill includes support of almost all of California's tribes — both federally recognized and unrecognized — to ensure that the cultural heritage of all Native American people is protected."

Assemblyman Mike Gatto, D-Los Angeles, was the bill's principal author.

The legislation changes the California Environmental Quality Act to require the lead agency on a project for environmental assessments to consult with a Native American tribe within 30 days of receiving their request.

Click the link below to read the rest of the article, use your back button to return to this page:
<http://www.montereyherald.com/localnews/ci_26652910/native-american-sacred-site-bill-passes>
If the link isn't clickable please copy and past to the address bar of a new blank tab.
 
Material appearing here is distributed without profit or monitory gain to those who have expressed an interest in receiving the material for research and educational purposes. This is in accordance with Title 17 U. S. C. section 107..
http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.html

Prayer Request

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Working Together to Provide Resources to Prevent Bullying This Month and Every Month

Asking for prayers for my son Kyle Brown. He is in his Freshman fall at Lewis & Clark College and just found out he has Mononucleosis. I think it must be Lewis and Clark. My sister-in-law had it while there. But then again it may be heredity as his Uncle Terry Supahan and I are one of the few people that have had it twice.

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Andre Cramblit, Operations Director
NCIDC, 
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(707) 445-8451
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NCIDC
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columbus day (holidaze)

columbus day (holidaze)
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columbus day (holidaze)

September 26, 2003
 
Columbus Day
 
White supremacist mentalities guide the actions of whites who idolize individuals such as Columbus as heroes. How could any descent human being say otherwise? For example, Columbus’s staunch supporters steadfastly ignore the fact that he, by landing on a small Caribbean Island and capturing people to be sold as slaves, began what would be the world’s most horrendous human tragedy, the complete destruction of a great many of the civilizations of two continents, and the near destruction of the remainder, a process that included the massacre of tens of millions of First Nations Peoples.
 
The number of our Peoples who died, and in many cases who are still dying, because of the European invasion he initiated, is incalculable. The closest number one can estimate, when taking into consideration that the slaughter started in 1492 has continued to a certain degree to this day, is several hundred millions. And, the vast majority of the millions who are the remnant of the original great civilizations that once prospered across the two continents, live a poverty stricken existence. This is something that should instill in the people whose ancestors begot the horror shame, not pride.
 
The idolizing of such barbarians as Columbus by European descended populations is not restricted to any one corner of the Americas. For instance, in Halifax, Nova Scotia, there is a park named in honour of Edward Cornwallis, the Province’s eighteenth century blood thirsty British colonial Governor, who participated in an attempt to commit genocide - it contains a large statue of him. He, and his Council, on October 1, 1749, decided to try to exterminate the Mi’kmaq indigenous to what is now Canada’s Maritime provinces. The method chosen by them to try to realize their inhuman goal was to issue a Proclamation offering a bounty of ten pounds (British money) for the scalps of the people, including women and children. On June 21, 1750, perhaps because the scalps were not coming in fast enough, they issued another proclamation upping the bounty to fifty pounds.
 
Unfortunately, not knowing their histories, many of our Peoples innocently participate in the idolizing of these monsters. In view of this, I believe that it is time for us to undertake an in-depth education process that would instill in our Peoples the historic knowledge that would eventually see them undertake a complete boycott of any celebration, building, park, arena, etc. named in honour of the monsters who promoted the slaughter of our ancestors. In honour of the memories of our persecuted ancestors, can we in good conscience aspire to do anything less?
 
Daniel N. Paul
 
http://www.danielnpaul.com
 

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Papal Bullsh**t (holidaze)

Papal Bullsh**t (holidaze)
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Papal BS (holidaze)

Hi Folks:
 
Please read the following before viewing the attached pictures we took at Virginia Beach, Virginia on May 15, 2014. This statement made by Dalhousie University professor Susan Sherwin, about the underlying cause of racism, is the best description I’ve ever read. It puts into words why it is so hard to get society to recognize, and accept that the systemic racism that victimizes First Nations Peoples exists: “...the greatest danger of oppression lies where bias is so pervasive as to be invisible...”
 
On Monday many places in the Americas will be celebrating Columbus day, a day set aside to honor him for the “discoveries” he never made (in the United States of America it’s a national holiday.)
 
His so-called “discovery” should not live on and he should not be honored because Columbus did not discover anyplace - you cannot discover what has already been discovered. Just because the people who did the original discovering were a people of color does not change the fact that they discovered the Americas first! But White supremacist racism lives on” and is no better highlighted than by the erecting of a statue honoring Columbus in Puerto Rico, a savage White man with bloody hands. It lives on because White supremacist mentality reduces people of color to invisibility and thus they cannot be accredited for anything. His legacy for the Americas was death and destruction for the Indigenous Peoples of the two Continents and slavery for Africans!
 
From Tony Castanha, re. the subject of Papal Bull burning, October 9, 2014, Puerto Rico, : “The (Papal Bull Burning) here will be held on Sunday October 12 at 4pm in the town of Arecibo at La Posa del Ovispo. This is near where officials are actually erecting a huge Columbus statue along the lines of the "Statue of Liberty." 'Ae, you heard me right... in the Year 2014 they are erecting a huge statue of the Hitler of the Caribbean.”
 
 
 
All the best,
 
Danny
 
Mi'kmaw Sa'qmaw (Elder) (Dr.) Daniel N. Paul, C.M., O.N.S., LLD, DLIT
 
http://www.danielnpaul.com 

 

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April Carmello Growing Up Native (profile)

April Carmello Growing Up Native (profile)
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“Let me introduce myself,” says April Carmelo.

“I am Wintu, Maidu, Tongva, Acjachemen. I am the

granddaughter of Daniel Carmelo Sr. and Maria

Sepulveda, and William Frank Timmons and Mary  Jane

Gorbet. I am the youngest of seven children born to Anna

Timmons and Daniel Carmelo Jr.”

She is also a winner of the CTA American Indian/Alaska Native Human Rights Award. Carmelo received the award for demonstrating leadership and commitment in equal educational opportunity, eliminating stereotypes and preserving cultural heritage, traditions and values.
 
She’s the Indian Education Specialist for the Shasta Union High School District, which includes elementary schools in the Redding/Shasta area. A classified employee, she is a Shasta Secondary Education Association member.
 
The first thing people notice is the tribal tattoo on her face. “I put a lot thought, prayer and time into this,” she says. “I had seen pictures of women with tattoos, and knew I would eventually get one. It’s my commitment to my culture, my family and all the people who have made so many sacrifices. It’s very personal for me.”
 
Carmelo made news in 2012 when her son was the victim of a hate crime in the Shasta Lake area. A man attacked her son as he skateboarded by his house, yelling racial slurs and pointing a shotgun at him and her. The attacker was never prosecuted for lack of evidence, which Carmelo described as unjust. “If the roles were reversed and I was out wielding a gun threatening to kill people, I would have been in  jail,” she says.
 
For the full profile go to : http://www.cta.org/en/Professional-Development/Publications/2014/09/September-2014-California-Educator.aspx
 
 
Copyright © 2014 NCIDC, All rights reserved.
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Disease Debilitates This Single Native Mother of Two

Disease Debilitates This Single Native Mother of Two
Opportunity To Assist Family In Need
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Ginger Rogers, American Indian Education Center Director

DONATE HERE:
http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/disease-debilitates-this-single-native-mother-of-two/230480
Ginger is 28 years old and is from the Hoopa Indian Reservation.  After high school she went away to college, first to Southern Oregon University in Ashland and then to San Diego State University.  She put herself through school and obtained a degree in American Indian Studies with a minor in Psychology, all while raising two young sons (currently ages 7 & 5) on her own. This in itself is a huge accomplishment. However, Ginger had more challenges than other young single mothers putting herself through school because at the same time she suffered from very poor health. At one point Ginger was bedridden for six months and had to take a medical leave from school. The doctors could never agree on a diagnosis. She was misdiagnosed with fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, and lupus, to name just a few.  One doctor was even considering multiple sclerosis. However, no treatment helped and her condition continued to deteriorate.
 
But there is some good news!  Ginger has finally made some helpful connections, thanks to knowledgeable friends.  She has now seen a doctor who knows what is wrong and can treat her. Ginger has discovered that she has Late Stage Lyme disease.  The devastating part is that Ginger recalls the tick bite. She was even tested for Lyme disease in 2005 and her test actually came back positive. Unfortunately, since there is such widespread misconception that Lyme disease is rare in California, her health care provider at the time told her it was a false positive. As inconceivable as it is, because Lyme is not yet recognized by the medical establishment as a "real" disease, insurance companies will not cover the cost of treatment. Her doctor visits and medications have to be paid for out-of-pocket. Our goal is to raise $8,625 to carry Ginger through the first year and a half of these medical bills. 
 
Ginger has a small group of friends who are helping her.  We have all pitched in and paid $1,050.00 for her first medical visits and medication over the last couple of months to get her started. Unfortunately we just can’t manage it all on our own and we are asking for your help.
 
Please help us get Ginger healthy.  We want her sons to know her as we have known her, and we want her to be able to do the good work she loves to do on the Reservation.
 
Please join me in supporting Ginger Rogers in order for her to get access to the medical care she needs.
 Every dollar is appreciated! - To see more and donate go to: http://bit.ly/GingerRogersLyme
 


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